Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Volume 6, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 149-161, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-6-149-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 149-161, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-6-149-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  25 Jan 2006

25 Jan 2006

The effect of systematic measurement errors on atmospheric CO2 inversions: a quantitative assessment

C. Rödenbeck1, T. J. Conway2, and R. L. Langenfelds3 C. Rödenbeck et al.
  • 1Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany
  • 2NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder CO, USA
  • 3CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Australia

Abstract. Surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of CO2, estimated by an interannual atmospheric transport inversion from atmospheric mixing ratio measurements, are affected by several sources of errors, one of which is experimental errors. Quantitative information about such measurement errors can be obtained from regular co-located measurements done by different laboratories or using different experimental techniques. The present quantitative assessment is based on intercomparison information from the CMDL and CSIRO atmospheric measurement programs. We show that the effects of systematic measurement errors on inversion results are very small compared to other errors in the flux estimation (as well as compared to signal variability). As a practical consequence, this assessment justifies the merging of data sets from different laboratories or different experimental techniques (flask and in-situ), if systematic differences (and their changes) are comparable to those considered here. This work also highlights the importance of regular intercomparison programs.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation
Share