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ACP | Articles | Volume 19, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 499-521, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-499-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 499-521, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-499-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 14 Jan 2019

Research article | 14 Jan 2019

Volatile organic compounds and ozone in Rocky Mountain National Park during FRAPPÉ

Katherine B. Benedict et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Katherine Benedict on behalf of the Authors (21 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Oct 2018) by Eleanor Browne
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (24 Nov 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Dec 2018) by Eleanor Browne
AR by Katherine Benedict on behalf of the Authors (11 Dec 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (18 Dec 2018) by Eleanor Browne
AR by Katherine Benedict on behalf of the Authors (20 Dec 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Rocky Mountain National Park experiences high ozone concentrations that can exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard. As part of the FRAPPÉ field campaign, a suite of volatile organic compounds were measured to characterize the sources of ozone precursors that contribute to high ozone in the park. These measurements indicate emissions from the Front Range in Colorado tied to oil and gas operations, urban areas, and the stratosphere contribute to episodes of elevated ozone.
Rocky Mountain National Park experiences high ozone concentrations that can exceed the National...
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