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Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 Apr 2019

Research article | 08 Apr 2019

Lidar measurements of thin laminations within Arctic clouds

Emily M. McCullough et al.

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Cited articles

Andraea, M. O., Browell, E. V., Garstang, M., Gregory, G. L., Harriss, R. C., Hill, G. F., and Jacob, D. J.: Biomass-burning emissions and associated haze layers over Amazonia, J. Geophys. Res., 93, 1509–1527, 1988.
Beals, M. J., Fugal, J. P., Shaw, R. A., Lu, J., Spuler, S. M., and Stith, J. L.: Holographic measurements of inhomogeneous cloud mixing at the centimeter scale, Science, 350, 87–90, 2015.
Bourdages, L., Duck, T. J., Lesins, G., Drummond, J. R., and Eloranta, E. W.: Physical properties of High Arctic tropospheric particles during winter, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 6881–6897, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-9-6881-2009, 2009.
Brock, C. A., Radke, L. F., and Hobbs, P. V.: Sulfur in particles in Arctic hazes derived from airborne in situ and lidar measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 22369–22387, 1990.
Curry, J. A., Ebert, E. E., and Herman, G. F.: Mean and turbulence structure of the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer, Q. J. Roy. Meteorol. Soc., 114, 715–746, 1988.
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Short summary
Very thin (<10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; Eureka, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic). The laminations can last longer than 24 h and are often associated with precipitation and atmospheric stability. This has implications for our understanding of cloud internal structure and processes.
Very thin (10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the...
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