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Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595-4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595-4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 Apr 2019

Research article | 08 Apr 2019

Lidar measurements of thin laminations within Arctic clouds

Emily M. McCullough, James R. Drummond, and Thomas J. Duck Emily M. McCullough et al.
  • Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Rd., P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2, Canada

Abstract. Very thin ( < 10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; located at Eureka, Nunavut, in the Canadian High Arctic). CRL's time (1 min) and altitude (7.5 m) resolutions from 500 m to greater than 12 km altitude make these measurements possible. We have observed a variety of thicknesses for individual laminations, with some at least as thin as the detection limit of the lidar (7.5 m). The clouds which contain the laminated features are typically found below 4 km, can last longer than 24 h, and occur most frequently during periods of snow and rain, often during very stable temperature inversion conditions. Results are presented for range-scaled photocounts at 532 and 355 nm, ratios of 532∕355 nm photocounts, and the 532 nm linear depolarization parameter, and with context provided by twice-daily Eureka radiosonde temperature and relative humidity profiles.

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Very thin (<10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; Eureka, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic). The laminations can last longer than 24 h and are often associated with precipitation and atmospheric stability. This has implications for our understanding of cloud internal structure and processes.
Very thin (10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the...
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