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ACP | Articles | Volume 19, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12397–12412, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12397-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 12397–12412, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-12397-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 Oct 2019

Research article | 08 Oct 2019

Photomineralization mechanism changes the ability of dissolved organic matter to activate cloud droplets and to nucleate ice crystals

Nadine Borduas-Dedekind et al.
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Photomineralization mechanism changes the ability of dissolved organic matter to activate cloud droplets and to nucleate ice crystals Nadine Borduas-Dedekind https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000342107

Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
During atmospheric transport, dissolved organic matter (DOM) within aqueous aerosols undergoes photochemistry. We find that photochemical processing of DOM increases its ability to form cloud droplets but decreases its ability to form ice crystals over a simulated 4.6 days in the atmosphere. A photomineralization mechanism involving the loss of organic carbon and the production of organic acids, CO and CO2 explains the observed changes and affects the liquid-water-to-ice ratio in clouds.
During atmospheric transport, dissolved organic matter (DOM) within aqueous aerosols undergoes...
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