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Volume 18, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9025–9048, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9025-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9025–9048, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9025-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 28 Jun 2018

Research article | 28 Jun 2018

Can explicit convection improve modelled dust in summertime West Africa?

Alexander J. Roberts et al.
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Acker, J. G. and Leptoukh, G.: Online Analysis Enhances Use of NASA Earth Science Data, Eos, Trans. AGU, 88, 14–15, 2007.
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Short summary
The summer Saharan dust hotspot is seasonally tied to the occurrence of convective storms. Global weather and climate models parameterise convection and so are unable to represent their associated dust uplift (haboobs). However, this work shows that even when simulations represent convection explicitly: (1) dust fields are not strongly affected, (2) convective storms are too small, (3) haboobs are too weak and (4) the land surface (bare soil and soil moisture) is dominant in controlling dust.
The summer Saharan dust hotspot is seasonally tied to the occurrence of convective storms....
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