Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2065-2079, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2065-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
13 Feb 2018
Updated emission inventories of power plants in simulating air quality during haze periods over East China
Lei Zhang1,2, Tianliang Zhao1,2, Sunling Gong3, Shaofei Kong1,2,4, Lili Tang5, Duanyang Liu6, Yongwei Wang2, Lianji Jin2, Yunpeng Shan7, Chenghao Tan1,2, Yingjie Zhang1,2, and Xiaomei Guo8 1Climate and Weather Disasters Collaborative Innovation Center, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing, 210044, China
2Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing, 210044, China
3Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China
4Department of Atmospheric Sciences, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China
5Jiangsu Environmental Monitoring Center, Nanjing, 210036, China
6Observatory of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, 210008, China
7Division of Atmospheric Science, Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada 89512, USA
8Weather Modification Office of Sichuan Province, Chengdu, 610072, China
Abstract. Air pollutant emissions play a determinant role in deteriorating air quality. However, an uncertainty in emission inventories is still the key problem for modeling air pollution. In this study, an updated emission inventory of coal-fired power plants (UEIPP) based on online monitoring data in Jiangsu Province of East China for the year of 2012 was implemented in the widely used Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC). By employing the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem), two simulation experiments were executed to assess the atmospheric environment change by using the original MEIC emission inventory and the MEIC inventory with the UEIPP. A synthetic analysis shows that power plant emissions of PM2.5, PM10, SO2, and NOx were lower, and CO, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds) were higher in UEIPP relative to those in MEIC, reflecting a large discrepancy in the power plant emissions over East China. In accordance with the changes in UEIPP, the modeled concentrations were reduced for SO2 and NO2, and increased for most areas of primary OC, BC, and CO. Interestingly, when the UEIPP was used, the atmospheric oxidizing capacity significantly reinforced. This was reflected by increased oxidizing agents, e.g., O3 and OH, thus directly strengthening the chemical production from SO2 and NOx to sulfate and nitrate, respectively, which offset the reduction of primary PM2.5 emissions especially on haze days. This study indicates the importance of updating air pollutant emission inventories in simulating the complex atmospheric environment changes with implications on air quality and environmental changes.
Citation: Zhang, L., Zhao, T., Gong, S., Kong, S., Tang, L., Liu, D., Wang, Y., Jin, L., Shan, Y., Tan, C., Zhang, Y., and Guo, X.: Updated emission inventories of power plants in simulating air quality during haze periods over East China, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2065-2079, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2065-2018, 2018.
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Short summary
An updated emission inventory of coal-fired power plants (UEIPP) based on online monitoring data in Jiangsu Province in China for the year of 2012 was implemented in the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC). By employing the model WRF-Chem, two simulations were executed to assess the atmospheric environmental change by using the original MEIC and the MEIC with the UEIPP. Interestingly, when the UEIPP was used, the atmospheric oxidizing capacity significantly reinforced.
An updated emission inventory of coal-fired power plants (UEIPP) based on online monitoring data...
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