Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Volume 18, issue 19 | Copyright

Special issue: CHemistry and AeRosols Mediterranean EXperiments (ChArMEx)...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14371-14391, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14371-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 09 Oct 2018

Research article | 09 Oct 2018

Multi-year chemical composition of the fine-aerosol fraction in Athens, Greece, with emphasis on the contribution of residential heating in wintertime

Christina Theodosi1,2,*, Maria Tsagkaraki1, Pavlos Zarmpas1, Georgios Grivas2, Eleni Liakakou2, Despina Paraskevopoulou2, Maria Lianou2, Evangelos Gerasopoulos2, and Nikolaos Mihalopoulos1,2 Christina Theodosi et al.
  • 1Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, 71003, Greece
  • 2Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development (IERSD), National Observatory of Athens, P. Penteli, Athens, 15236, Greece
  • * Invited contribution by Christina Theodosi, recipient of the EGU Atmospheric Sciences Outstanding Student Poster Award 2016.

Abstract. In an attempt to take effective action towards mitigating pollution episodes in Athens, precise knowledge of PM2.5 composition and its sources is a prerequisite. Thus, a 2-year chemical composition dataset from aerosol samples collected in an urban background site in central Athens from December 2013 to March 2016 has been obtained and a positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied in order to identify and apportion fine aerosols to their sources. A total of 850 aerosol samples were collected on a 12 to 24h basis and analyzed for major ions, trace elements, and organic and elemental carbon, allowing us to further assess the impact of residential heating as a source of air pollution over Athens.

The ionic and carbonaceous components were found to constitute the major fraction of the PM2.5 aerosol mass. The annual contribution of the ion mass (IM), particulate organic mass (POM), dust, elemental carbon (EC), and sea salt (SS) was calculated at 31%, 38%, 18%, 8%, and 3%, respectively, and exhibited considerable seasonal variation. In winter, the share of IM was estimated down to 23%, with POM+ EC being the dominant component accounting for 52% of the PM2.5 mass, while in summer, IM (42%) and carbonaceous aerosols (41%) contributed almost equally.

Results from samples collected on a 12h basis (day and night) during the three intensive winter campaigns indicated the impact of heating on the levels of a series of compounds. Indeed, PM2.5, EC, POM, NO3, C2O42−, non sea salt (nss) K+ and selected trace metals including Cd and Pb were increased by up to a factor of 4 in the night compared to the day, highlighting the importance of heating on air quality in Athens. Furthermore, in order to better characterize wintertime aerosol sources and quantify the impact of biomass burning on PM2.5 levels, source apportionment was performed. The data can be interpreted on the basis of six sources, namely biomass burning (31%), vehicular emissions (19%), heavy oil combustion (7%), regional secondary (21%), marine aerosols (9%), and dust particles (8%). Regarding night-to-day patterns their contributions shifted from 19%, 19%, 8%, 31%, 12%, and 10% of the PM2.5 mass during day to 39%, 19%, 6%, 14%, 7%, and 7% during the night, underlining the significance of biomass burning as the main contributor to fine particle levels during nighttime in winter.

Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
A long-term estimation of the chemical composition of PM2.5, a chemical mass closure exercise, and the source identification of particulate matter took place at an urban background site of central Athens, allowing us to further assess the impact of residential heating as a source of air pollution over Athens. PM2.5, EC, POM, NO3-, C2O42-, nssK+, Pb, and Cd were increased by up to a factor of 4 at night compared to during the day, highlighting the importance of heating on air quality in Athens.
A long-term estimation of the chemical composition of PM2.5, a chemical mass closure exercise,...
Citation
Share