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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9665-9675, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9665-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
10 Aug 2017
Observational evidence for the formation of DMS-derived aerosols during Arctic phytoplankton blooms
Ki-Tae Park1,*, Sehyun Jang2,*, Kitack Lee2, Young Jun Yoon1, Min-Seob Kim3, Kihong Park4, Hee-Joo Cho4, Jung-Ho Kang1, Roberto Udisti5, Bang-Yong Lee1, and Kyung-Hoon Shin6 1Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, 21990, South Korea
2Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 37673, South Korea
3Environment Measurement & Analysis Center, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon, 22689, South Korea
4School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju, 61005, South Korea
5Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Florence, 50016, Italy
6Department of Marine Sciences and Convergent Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan, 1588, South Korea
*These authors contributed equally to this work.
Abstract. The connection between marine biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and the formation of aerosol particles in the Arctic atmosphere was evaluated by analyzing atmospheric DMS mixing ratio, aerosol particle size distribution and aerosol chemical composition data that were concurrently collected at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (78.5° N, 11.8° E), during April and May 2015. Measurements of aerosol sulfur (S) compounds showed distinct patterns during periods of Arctic haze (April) and phytoplankton blooms (May). Specifically, during the phytoplankton bloom period the contribution of DMS-derived SO42− to the total aerosol SO42− increased by 7-fold compared with that during the proceeding Arctic haze period, and accounted for up to 70 % of fine SO42− particles (<  2.5 µm in diameter). The results also showed that the formation of submicron SO42− aerosols was significantly associated with an increase in the atmospheric DMS mixing ratio. More importantly, two independent estimates of the formation of DMS-derived SO42− aerosols, calculated using the stable S-isotope ratio and the non-sea-salt SO42− ∕ methanesulfonic acid ratio, respectively, were in close agreement, providing compelling evidence that the contribution of biogenic DMS to the formation of aerosol particles was substantial during the Arctic phytoplankton bloom period.

Citation: Park, K.-T., Jang, S., Lee, K., Yoon, Y. J., Kim, M.-S., Park, K., Cho, H.-J., Kang, J.-H., Udisti, R., Lee, B.-Y., and Shin, K.-H.: Observational evidence for the formation of DMS-derived aerosols during Arctic phytoplankton blooms, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9665-9675, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9665-2017, 2017.
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Short summary
We evaluated the connection between DMS and the formation of aerosol particles in the Arctic atmosphere by analyzing multiple datasets of atmospheric DMS, aerosol particle size distributions and aerosol chemical composition that were collected at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (78.5° N, 11.8° E), during April–May 2015. The key finding from this research is that the contribution of biogenic DMS to the formation of aerosol particles was substantial during the phytoplankton bloom period.
We evaluated the connection between DMS and the formation of aerosol particles in the Arctic...
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