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Volume 17, issue 13 | Copyright

Special issue: Atmospheric emissions from oil sands development and their...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8411-8427, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8411-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 11 Jul 2017

Research article | 11 Jul 2017

Understanding the primary emissions and secondary formation of gaseous organic acids in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada

John Liggio et al.
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The emission and formation of gaseous organic acids from the oil sands industry in Canada is explored through aircraft measurements directly over and downwind wind of industrial facilities. Results demonstrated that the formation of organic acids through atmospheric chemical reactions dominated over the direct emissions from mining activities but could not be explicitly modeled. The results highlight the need for improved understanding of photochemical mechanisms leading to these species.
The emission and formation of gaseous organic acids from the oil sands industry in Canada is...
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