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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 17, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7541–7554, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7541–7554, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7541-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 22 Jun 2017

Research article | 22 Jun 2017

Status update: is smoke on your mind? Using social media to assess smoke exposure

Bonne Ford et al.
Data sets

Maps of raw and gridded, population-weighted percent of Facebook Posters matching search criteria B. Ford, J. R. Pierce, and M. Burke http://hdl.handle.net/10217/177043

WRF-Chem simulated surface PM2.5 B. Ford, W. Lassman, and G. Pfister http://hdl.handle.net/10217/177042

Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We explore using the percent of Facebook posters mentioning smoke or air quality to assess exposure to wildfire smoke in the western US during summer 2015. We compare this de-identified, aggregated Facebook dataset to satellite observations, surface measurements, and model-simulated concentrations, and we find good agreement in smoke-impacted regions. Our results suggest that aggregate social media data can be used to supplement traditional datasets to estimate smoke exposure.
We explore using the percent of Facebook posters mentioning smoke or air quality to assess...
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