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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7143-7155, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7143-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
15 Jun 2017
Characterization of fresh and aged organic aerosol emissions from meat charbroiling
Christos Kaltsonoudis1,2, Evangelia Kostenidou1, Evangelos Louvaris1,2, Magda Psichoudaki1,2, Epameinondas Tsiligiannis1,2, Kalliopi Florou1,2, Aikaterini Liangou1,2, and Spyros N. Pandis1,2,3 1Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences, ICE-HT, Patras, Greece
2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Patras, Greece
3Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA
Abstract. Cooking emissions can be a significant source of fine particulate matter in urban areas. In this study the aerosol- and gas-phase emissions from meat charbroiling were characterized. Greek souvlakia with pork were cooked using a commercial charbroiler and a fraction of the emissions were introduced into a smog chamber where after a characterization phase they were exposed to UV illumination and oxidants. The particulate and gas phases were characterized by a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) correspondingly. More than 99 % of the aerosol emitted was composed of organic compounds, while black carbon (BC) contributed 0.3 % and the inorganic species less than 0.5 % of the total aerosol mass. The initial O  :  C ratio was approximately 0.09 and increased up to 0.30 after a few hours of chemical aging (exposures of 1010 molecules cm−3 s for OH and 100 ppb h for ozone). The initial and aged AMS spectra differed considerably (θ =  27°). Ambient measurements were also conducted during Fat Thursday in Patras, Greece, when traditionally meat is charbroiled everywhere in the city. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed that cooking organic aerosol (COA) reached up to 85 % of the total OA from 10:00 to 12:00 LST that day. The ambient COA factor in two major Greek cities had a mass spectrum during spring and summer similar to the aged meat charbroiling emissions. In contrast, the ambient COA factor during winter resembled strongly the fresh laboratory meat charbroiling emissions.

Citation: Kaltsonoudis, C., Kostenidou, E., Louvaris, E., Psichoudaki, M., Tsiligiannis, E., Florou, K., Liangou, A., and Pandis, S. N.: Characterization of fresh and aged organic aerosol emissions from meat charbroiling, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7143-7155, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7143-2017, 2017.
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Short summary
Cooking emissions can be a significant source of particulate matter in urban areas. In this study the aerosol- and gas-phase emissions from meat charbroiling were characterized. More than 99% of the aerosol emitted was composed of organic compounds. The fresh particles were similar to the cooking organic aerosol over Greek cities during the winter, while the reacted particles were similar to those found in the atmosphere during the summer.
Cooking emissions can be a significant source of particulate matter in urban areas. In this...
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