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Volume 17, issue 7 | Copyright
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 4477-4491, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4477-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 03 Apr 2017

Research article | 03 Apr 2017

Impacts of coal burning on ambient PM2.5 pollution in China

Qiao Ma et al.
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Short summary
In order to quantitatively identify the contributions of coal combustion to airborne fine particles, we developed an emission inventory using up-to-date information and conducted simulations using an atmospheric model. Results show that coal combustion contributes 40 % of the airborne fine-particle concentration on national average in China. Among the subsectors of coal combustion, industrial coal burning is the dominant contributor, which should be prioritized when policies are applied.
In order to quantitatively identify the contributions of coal combustion to airborne fine...
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