Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 385-402, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-385-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
10 Jan 2017
Direct oceanic emissions unlikely to account for the missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide
Sinikka T. Lennartz et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Review', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Reply to reviewer#1', Sinikka Lennartz, 22 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Reivew of Lennartz et al', Anonymous Referee #2, 19 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Reply to reviewer#2', Sinikka Lennartz, 22 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
SC1: 'comment on Lennartz et al.'s paper', S. Belviso, 28 Oct 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC3: 'Reply to comment by S. Belviso', Sinikka Lennartz, 22 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
SC2: 'Comments relating to the OCS photoproduction rates calculated by Lennartz et al.', Cedric Fichot, 09 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
AC4: 'Reply to comment by C. Fichot', Sinikka Lennartz, 22 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (23 Nov 2016)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 Nov 2016) by Steven Brown
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Dec 2016)  
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Dec 2016) by Steven Brown  
AR by Sinikka Lennartz on behalf of the Authors (08 Dec 2016)  Author's response  Manuscript
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Short summary
We present new sea surface and marine boundary layer measurements of carbonyl sulfide, the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere, and calculate an oceanic emission estimate. Our results imply that oceanic emissions are very unlikely to account for the missing source in the atmospheric budget that is currently discussed for OCS.
We present new sea surface and marine boundary layer measurements of carbonyl sulfide, the most...
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