Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 3083-3095, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-3083-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
28 Feb 2017
Enhanced trans-Himalaya pollution transport to the Tibetan Plateau by cut-off low systems
Ruixiong Zhang1, Yuhang Wang1, Qiusheng He2, Laiguo Chen3, Yuzhong Zhang1, Hang Qu1, Charles Smeltzer1, Jianfeng Li1, Leonardo M. A. Alvarado4, Mihalis Vrekoussis4,5,6, Andreas Richter4, Folkard Wittrock4, and John P. Burrows4 1School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA
2School of Environment and Safety, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, China
3Urban Environment and Ecology Research Center, South China Institute of Environmental Sciences (SCIES), Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou, China
4Institute of Environmental Physics and Remote Sensing, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
5Center of Marine Environmental Sciences – MARUM, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
6Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC), The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
Abstract. Long-range transport followed by deposition of black carbon on glaciers of Tibet is one of the key issues of climate research as it induces changes on radiative forcing and subsequently impacting the melting of glaciers. The transport mechanism, however, is not well understood. In this study, we use short-lived reactive aromatics as proxies to diagnose transport of pollutants to Tibet. In situ observations of short-lived reactive aromatics across the Tibetan Plateau are analyzed using a regional chemistry and transport model. The model performance using the current emission inventories over the region is poor due to problems in the inventories and model transport. Top-down emissions constrained by satellite observations of glyoxal are a factor of 2–6 higher than the a priori emissions over the industrialized Indo-Gangetic Plain. Using the top-down emissions, agreement between model simulations and surface observations of aromatics improves. We find enhancements of reactive aromatics over Tibet by a factor of 6 on average due to rapid transport from India and nearby regions during the presence of a high-altitude cut-off low system. Our results suggest that the cut-off low system is a major pathway for long-range transport of pollutants such as black carbon. The modeling analysis reveals that even the state-of-the-science high-resolution reanalysis cannot simulate this cut-off low system accurately, which probably explains in part the underestimation of black carbon deposition over Tibet in previous modeling studies. Another model deficiency of underestimating pollution transport from the south is due to the complexity of terrain, leading to enhanced transport. It is therefore challenging for coarse-resolution global climate models to properly represent the effects of long-range transport of pollutants on the Tibetan environment and the subsequent consequence for regional climate forcing.

Citation: Zhang, R., Wang, Y., He, Q., Chen, L., Zhang, Y., Qu, H., Smeltzer, C., Li, J., Alvarado, L. M. A., Vrekoussis, M., Richter, A., Wittrock, F., and Burrows, J. P.: Enhanced trans-Himalaya pollution transport to the Tibetan Plateau by cut-off low systems, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 3083-3095, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-3083-2017, 2017.
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We use short-lived reactive aromatics as proxies to diagnose transport of pollutants to Tibet. In situ observations of short-lived reactive aromatics across the Tibetan Plateau are analyzed using a regional chemistry and transport model. Our results suggest that the cut-off low system is a major pathway for long-range transport of pollutants such as black carbon. The modeling analysis reveals that even the state-of-the-science reanalysis cannot simulate this cut-off system accurately.
We use short-lived reactive aromatics as proxies to diagnose transport of pollutants to Tibet....
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