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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 17, issue 4 | Copyright
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 3055-3066, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-3055-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 28 Feb 2017

Research article | 28 Feb 2017

Effects of ozone–vegetation coupling on surface ozone air quality via biogeochemical and meteorological feedbacks

Mehliyar Sadiq1, Amos P. K. Tai1,2, Danica Lombardozzi3, and Maria Val Martin4 Mehliyar Sadiq et al.
  • 1Graduate Division of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 2Earth System Science Programme, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
  • 3Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA
  • 4Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Abstract. Tropospheric ozone is one of the most hazardous air pollutants as it harms both human health and plant productivity. Foliage uptake of ozone via dry deposition damages photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. These foliage changes could lead to a cascade of biogeochemical and biogeophysical effects that not only modulate the carbon cycle, regional hydrometeorology and climate, but also cause feedbacks onto surface ozone concentration itself. In this study, we implement a semi-empirical parameterization of ozone damage on vegetation in the Community Earth System Model to enable online ozone–vegetation coupling, so that for the first time ecosystem structure and ozone concentration can coevolve in fully coupled land–atmosphere simulations. With ozone–vegetation coupling, present-day surface ozone is simulated to be higher by up to 4–6ppbv over Europe, North America and China. Reduced dry deposition velocity following ozone damage contributes to ∼ 40–100% of those increases, constituting a significant positive biogeochemical feedback on ozone air quality. Enhanced biogenic isoprene emission is found to contribute to most of the remaining increases, and is driven mainly by higher vegetation temperature that results from lower transpiration rate. This isoprene-driven pathway represents an indirect, positive meteorological feedback. The reduction in both dry deposition and transpiration is mostly associated with reduced stomatal conductance following ozone damage, whereas the modification of photosynthesis and further changes in ecosystem productivity are found to play a smaller role in contributing to the ozone–vegetation feedbacks. Our results highlight the need to consider two-way ozone–vegetation coupling in Earth system models to derive a more complete understanding and yield more reliable future predictions of ozone air quality.

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Surface ozone harms vegetation, which can influence not only climate but also ozone air quality itself. We implement a scheme for ozone damage on vegetation into an Earth system model, so that for the first time simulated vegetation and ozone can coevolve in a fully coupled simulation. With ozone–vegetation coupling, simulated ozone is found to be significantly higher by up to 6 ppbv. Reduced dry deposition and enhanced isoprene emission contribute to most of these increases.
Surface ozone harms vegetation, which can influence not only climate but also ozone air quality...
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