Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2971-2980, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2971-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
27 Feb 2017
Attributions of meteorological and emission factors to the 2015 winter severe haze pollution episodes in China's Jing-Jin-Ji area
Tingting Liu1,2, Sunling Gong2,4, Jianjun He2, Meng Yu3, Qifeng Wang4, Huairui Li4, Wei Liu3, Jie Zhang3, Lei Li3, Xuguan Wang3, Shuli Li3, Yanli Lu3, Haitao Du5, Yaqiang Wang2, Chunhong Zhou2, Hongli Liu2, and Qichao Zhao4 1School of Mechanical Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, China
2State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather & Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry of CMA, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China
3Langfang Bureau of Environmental Protection, Langfang, Hebei, China
4Langfang Academy of Eco Industrialization for Wisdom Environment, Langfang, Hebei, China
5Langfang Bureau of Meteorology, Langfang, Hebei, China
Abstract. In the 2015 winter month of December, northern China witnessed the most severe air pollution phenomena since the 2013 winter haze events occurred. This triggered the first-ever red alert in the air pollution control history of Beijing, with an instantaneous fine particulate matter (PM2. 5) concentration over 1 mg m−3. Air quality observations reveal large temporal–spatial variations in PM2. 5 concentrations over the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (Jing-Jin-Ji) area between 2014 and 2015. Compared to 2014, the PM2. 5 concentrations over the area decreased significantly in all months except November and December of 2015, with an increase of 36 % in December. Analysis shows that the PM2. 5 concentrations are significantly correlated with the local meteorological parameters in the Jing-Jin-Ji area such as the stable conditions, relative humidity (RH), and wind field. A comparison of two month simulations (December 2014 and 2015) with the same emission data was performed to explore and quantify the meteorological impacts on the PM2. 5 over the Jing-Jin-Ji area. Observation and modeling results show that the worsening meteorological conditions are the main reasons behind this unusual increase of air pollutant concentrations and that the emission control measures taken during this period of time have contributed to mitigate the air pollution ( ∼  9 %) in the region. This work provides a scientific insight into the emission control measures vs. the meteorology impacts for the period.

Citation: Liu, T., Gong, S., He, J., Yu, M., Wang, Q., Li, H., Liu, W., Zhang, J., Li, L., Wang, X., Li, S., Lu, Y., Du, H., Wang, Y., Zhou, C., Liu, H., and Zhao, Q.: Attributions of meteorological and emission factors to the 2015 winter severe haze pollution episodes in China's Jing-Jin-Ji area, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2971-2980, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2971-2017, 2017.
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This paper presents a study on the severe air pollution in the winter of 2015 in China's Jing-Jin-Ji area. This triggered the first-ever red alert in the air pollution control history of Beijing, with an instantaneous PM2.5 concentration over 1 mg m−3. Analysis and modeling results show that the worsening meteorology conditions are the main reason behind this unusual increase in air pollutant concentrations.
This paper presents a study on the severe air pollution in the winter of 2015 in China's...
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