Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2943-2970, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2943-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
01 Mar 2017
US surface ozone trends and extremes from 1980 to 2014: quantifying the roles of rising Asian emissions, domestic controls, wildfires, and climate
Meiyun Lin et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'Textbook example of an excellent modelling study', Anonymous Referee #1, 12 Dec 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to Reviewer #1', Meiyun Lin, 21 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Review of Lin et al. [2016]', Anonymous Referee #2, 30 Dec 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to Reviewer #2', Meiyun Lin, 21 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Meiyun Lin on behalf of the Authors (02 Feb 2017)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (06 Feb 2017) by Bryan N. Duncan
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
US ozone pollution responds to varying global-to-regional precursor emissions and climate, with implications for designing effective air quality control policies. Asian anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors tripled since 1990, contributing 65 % to western US ozone increases in spring, outpacing ozone decreases attained via 50 % US emission controls. In the eastern US, if emissions had not declined, more frequent hot extremes since 1990 would have worsened the highest ozone events in summer.
US ozone pollution responds to varying global-to-regional precursor emissions and climate, with...
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