Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14291-14307, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14291-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
01 Dec 2017
Real-time detection of airborne fluorescent bioparticles in Antarctica
Ian Crawford et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Calibration needed', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Reply to Anonymous Referee #1', Ian Crawford, 09 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Synopsis "Real Time Detection of Airborne Bioparticles in Antarctica" (Crawford et al.)', Mr Tobias Könemann, 15 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Reply to M. T. Könemann', Ian Crawford, 09 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC3: 'Crawford et al. review', Anonymous Referee #3, 22 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC3: 'Reply to Anonymous Referee #3', Ian Crawford, 09 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ian Crawford on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (29 Aug 2017) by Alex Huffman
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (12 Sep 2017)  
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (20 Sep 2017)  
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (05 Oct 2017) by Alex Huffman  
AR by Ian Crawford on behalf of the Authors (11 Oct 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (17 Oct 2017) by Alex Huffman  
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We present the first real-time detection of bioparticles on the Antarctic continent using a novel UV-LIF technique. The high time resolution of the technique allowed us to examine the relationships between bioparticle concentrations and airmass history and local winds, which would not have been possible with conventional high-volume filter sampling techniques. We also show evidence of episodic long-range transport of pollen from coastal South America to the continent.
We present the first real-time detection of bioparticles on the Antarctic continent using a...
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