Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14025-14037, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14025-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
24 Nov 2017
Electrospray surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (ES-SERS) for probing surface chemical compositions of atmospherically relevant particles
Masao Gen and Chak K. Chan
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Deposited AgNP SERS of Aerosols Review', Anonymous Referee #1, 19 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to RC1', Masao Gen, 15 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Reviews', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Jul 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to RC2', Masao Gen, 15 Aug 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Masao Gen on behalf of the Authors (30 Aug 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Sep 2017) by Ryan Sullivan
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Oct 2017)
ED: Publish as is (15 Oct 2017) by Ryan Sullivan  
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We propose electrospray-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (ES-SERS) for measuring the surface chemical compositions of atmospherically relevant particles. The observations of surface aqueous sulfate and adsorbed water demonstrate a possible role of the water in facilitating the dissolution of sulfate from the bulk phase into its water layers. ES-SERS of submicron ambient aerosol particles collected in Hong Kong indicated an enrichment of sulfate and organic matter on the particle surface.
We propose electrospray-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (ES-SERS) for measuring the surface...
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