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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 17, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 13417–13438, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-13417-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 13417–13438, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-13417-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 10 Nov 2017

Research article | 10 Nov 2017

Ethene, propene, butene and isoprene emissions from a ponderosa pine forest measured by relaxed eddy accumulation

Robert C. Rhew et al.

Data sets

Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory Field Site National Center for Atmospheric Research – Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling https://doi.org/10.5065/D61V5CDP

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Short summary
Alkenes emanate from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can contribute to atmospheric ozone production. This study measured light alkene (ethene, propene and butene) fluxes from a ponderosa pine forest using a novel relaxed eddy accumulation method, revealing much larger emissions than previously estimated and accounting for a significant fraction of OH reactivity. Emissions have a diurnal cycle related to sunlight and temperature, and the forest canopy appears to be the source.
Alkenes emanate from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can contribute to atmospheric...
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