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Volume 17, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1227-1239, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1227-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: East Asia emissions assessment (EA2)

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1227-1239, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1227-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 25 Jan 2017

Research article | 25 Jan 2017

Variations of China's emission estimates: response to uncertainties in energy statistics

Chaopeng Hong1,2, Qiang Zhang1,5, Kebin He2,4,5, Dabo Guan1,3, Meng Li1,2, Fei Liu1,2, and Bo Zheng2 Chaopeng Hong et al.
  • 1Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • 2State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • 3School of International Development, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
  • 4State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing, China
  • 5Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Beijing, China

Abstract. The accuracy of China's energy statistics is of great concern because it contributes greatly to the uncertainties in estimates of global emissions. This study attempts to improve the understanding of uncertainties in China's energy statistics and evaluate their impacts on China's emissions during the period of 1990–2013. We employed the Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC) model to calculate China's emissions based on different official data sets of energy statistics using the same emission factors. We found that the apparent uncertainties (maximum discrepancy) in China's energy consumption increased from 2004 to 2012, reaching a maximum of 646Mtce (million tons of coal equivalent) in 2011 and that coal dominated these uncertainties. The discrepancies between the national and provincial energy statistics were reduced after the three economic censuses conducted during this period, and converging uncertainties were found in 2013. The emissions calculated from the provincial energy statistics are generally higher than those calculated from the national energy statistics, and the apparent uncertainty ratio (the ratio of the maximum discrepancy to the mean value) owing to energy uncertainties in 2012 took values of 30.0, 16.4, 7.7, 9.2 and 15.6%, for SO2, NOx, VOC, PM2.5 and CO2 emissions, respectively. SO2 emissions are most sensitive to energy uncertainties because of the high contributions from industrial coal combustion. The calculated emission trends are also greatly affected by energy uncertainties – from 1996 to 2012, CO2 and NOx emissions, respectively, increased by 191 and 197% according to the provincial energy statistics but by only 145 and 139% as determined from the original national energy statistics. The energy-induced emission uncertainties for some species such as SO2 and NOx are comparable to total uncertainties of emissions as estimated by previous studies, indicating variations in energy consumption could be an important source of China's emission uncertainties.

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We found that the apparent uncertainties in China’s energy consumption increased from 2004 to 2012. SO2 emissions are most sensitive to energy uncertainties because of the high contributions from industrial coal combustion. The energy-induced emission uncertainties for some species are comparable to total uncertainties of emissions as estimated by previous studies, indicating variations in energy consumption could be an important source of China’s emission uncertainties.
We found that the apparent uncertainties in China’s energy consumption increased from 2004 to...
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