Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11089-11105, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11089-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
20 Sep 2017
Determination of enhancement ratios of HCOOH relative to CO in biomass burning plumes by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)
Matthieu Pommier1,a, Cathy Clerbaux1,2, and Pierre-Francois Coheur2 1LATMOS/IPSL, UPMC Univ. Paris 06 Sorbonne Universités, UVSQ, CNRS, Paris, France
2Spectroscopie de l'Atmosphère, Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium
anow at: Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo, Norway
Abstract. Formic acid (HCOOH) concentrations are often underestimated by models, and its chemistry is highly uncertain. HCOOH is, however, among the most abundant atmospheric volatile organic compounds, and it is potentially responsible for rain acidity in remote areas. HCOOH data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are analyzed from 2008 to 2014 to estimate enhancement ratios from biomass burning emissions over seven regions. Fire-affected HCOOH and CO total columns are defined by combining total columns from IASI, geographic location of the fires from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the surface wind speed field from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Robust correlations are found between these fire-affected HCOOH and CO total columns over the selected biomass burning regions, allowing the calculation of enhancement ratios equal to 7.30  ×  10−3 ± 0.08  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over Amazonia (AMA), 11.10  ×  10−3 ± 1.37  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over Australia (AUS), 6.80  ×  10−3 ± 0.44  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over India (IND), 5.80  ×  10−3 ± 0.15  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over Southeast Asia (SEA), 4.00  ×  10−3 ± 0.19  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over northern Africa (NAF), 5.00  ×  10−3 ± 0.13  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over southern Africa (SAF), and 4.40  ×  10−3 ± 0.09  ×  10−3 mol mol−1 over Siberia (SIB), in a fair agreement with previous studies. In comparison with referenced emission ratios, it is also shown that the selected agricultural burning plumes captured by IASI over India and Southeast Asia correspond to recent plumes where the chemistry or the sink does not occur. An additional classification of the enhancement ratios by type of fuel burned is also provided, showing a diverse origin of the plumes sampled by IASI, especially over Amazonia and Siberia. The variability in the enhancement ratios by biome over the different regions show that the levels of HCOOH and CO do not only depend on the fuel types.

Citation: Pommier, M., Clerbaux, C., and Coheur, P.-F.: Determination of enhancement ratios of HCOOH relative to CO in biomass burning plumes by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11089-11105, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11089-2017, 2017.
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
A new estimation of enhancement ratios relative to CO for HCOOH over seven biomass burning regions is proposed. Fire-affected HCOOH and CO total columns are defined by combining the total columns from IASI, geographic location of the fires from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and surface wind speed field from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). An additional classification of the enhancement ratios by type of fuel burned is also provided.
A new estimation of enhancement ratios relative to CO for HCOOH over seven biomass burning...
Share