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Volume 16, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 827–841, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-827-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 827–841, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-827-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 25 Jan 2016

Research article | 25 Jan 2016

Observational evidence of temperature trends at two levels in the surface layer

X. Lin et al.
Related subject area  
Subject: Dynamics | Research Activity: Field Measurements | Altitude Range: Troposphere | Science Focus: Physics (physical properties and processes)
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Cited articles  
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We found that the near-surface lapse rate has significantly decreased with a trend of −0.18 ± 0.03 °C (10 m)−1 per decade. We also showed that the 9 m height temperatures increased faster than temperatures at the 1.5 m screen level and/or conditions at the 1.5 m height cooled faster than at the 9 m height.
We found that the near-surface lapse rate has significantly decreased with a trend of −0.18 ±...
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