Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2013-2023, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-2013-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
23 Feb 2016
Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris
Andrea Paciga1,2, Eleni Karnezi1,2, Evangelia Kostenidou3, Lea Hildebrandt4, Magda Psichoudaki3,5, Gabriella J. Engelhart2, Byong-Hyoek Lee2, Monica Crippa6,7, André S. H. Prévôt6, Urs Baltensperger6, and Spyros N. Pandis1,3,5 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
2Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
3Inst. of Chemical Engineering Sciences, FORTH/ICEHT, Patras, Greece
4McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA
5Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Patras, Greece
6Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, 5232, Switzerland
7European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Air and Climate Unit, Via Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra, Italy
Abstract. Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function of temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar volatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half of the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 µg m−3 and another 35–40 % consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs with effective saturation concentrations C* of 10−3–0.1 µg m−3 and ELVOCs C* less or equal than 10−4 µg m−3, respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order of magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest volatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively of ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) was significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both semi-volatile organic components (SVOCs with C* in the 1–100 µg m−3 range) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter consisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The volatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors containing around 60 % SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor contained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant contributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally, combining the bulk average O : C ratios and volatility distributions of the various factors, our results are placed into the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. The OA factors cover a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average volatility and average O : C of the OA components.

Citation: Paciga, A., Karnezi, E., Kostenidou, E., Hildebrandt, L., Psichoudaki, M., Engelhart, G. J., Lee, B.-H., Crippa, M., Prévôt, A. S. H., Baltensperger, U., and Pandis, S. N.: Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 2013-2023, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-2013-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
We estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer and winter field campaigns in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The OA factors (hydrocarbon like OA, cooking OA, marine OA, oxygenated OA) had a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average volatility and average oxygen to carbon of the OA components.
We estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer...
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