Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.509 IF 5.509
  • IF 5-year value: 5.689 IF 5-year 5.689
  • CiteScore value: 5.44 CiteScore 5.44
  • SNIP value: 1.519 SNIP 1.519
  • SJR value: 3.032 SJR 3.032
  • IPP value: 5.37 IPP 5.37
  • h5-index value: 86 h5-index 86
  • Scimago H index value: 161 Scimago H index 161
Volume 16, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 1955-1970, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1955-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: The Pan European Gas-Aerosols Climate Interaction Study...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 1955-1970, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1955-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 22 Feb 2016

Research article | 22 Feb 2016

A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

M. Dal Maso1, L. Liao2, J. Wildt4, A. Kiendler-Scharr3, E. Kleist4, R. Tillmann3, M. Sipilä2, J. Hakala2, K. Lehtipalo2, M. Ehn2, V.-M. Kerminen2, M. Kulmala2, D. Worsnop2, and T. Mentel3 M. Dal Maso et al.
  • 1Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33100 Tampere, Finland
  • 2Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014, Helsinki, Finland
  • 3IEK-8, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany
  • 4IBG-2, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany

Abstract. Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant–atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
In this paper, we present the first direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We found that the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulphuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength, and that the formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid.
In this paper, we present the first direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation...
Citation
Share