Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 1937-1953, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-1937-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
22 Feb 2016
Ammonia in the summertime Arctic marine boundary layer: sources, sinks, and implications
Gregory R. Wentworth et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC C9634: 'Ammonia in the high arctic', Martin Johnson, 21 Nov 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
AC C12232: 'Response to Reviewer #1 (Martin Johnson)', Gregory Wentworth, 04 Feb 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC C11203: 'Impact of seabird emissions on Arctic ammonia', Anonymous Referee #2, 06 Jan 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC C12233: 'Response to Anonymous Reviewer #2', Gregory Wentworth, 04 Feb 2016 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Gregory Wentworth on behalf of the Authors (04 Feb 2016)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (05 Feb 2016) by Radovan Krejci
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Air near the surface in the summertime Arctic is extremely clean and typically has very low concentrations of both gases and particles. However, atmospheric measurements taken throughout the Canadian Arctic in the summer of 2014 revealed higher-than-expected amounts of gaseous ammonia. It is likely the majority of this ammonia is coming from migratory seabird colonies throughout the Arctic. Seabird guano (dung) releases ammonia which could impact climate and sensitive Arctic ecosystems.
Air near the surface in the summertime Arctic is extremely clean and typically has very low...
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