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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 16, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 14371–14396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-14371-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 14371–14396, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-14371-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Review article 18 Nov 2016

Review article | 18 Nov 2016

Satellite observations of atmospheric methane and their value for quantifying methane emissions

Daniel J. Jacob et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Daniel Jacob on behalf of the Authors (31 Oct 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (31 Oct 2016) by Bryan N. Duncan
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Methane is a greenhouse gas emitted by a range of natural and anthropogenic sources. Atmospheric methane has been measured continuously from space since 2003, and new instruments are planned to launch in the near future that will greatly expand the capabilities of space-based observations. We review the value of current, future, and proposed satellite observations to better quantify methane emissions from the global scale down to the scale of point sources.
Methane is a greenhouse gas emitted by a range of natural and anthropogenic sources. Atmospheric...
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