Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 5.668 IF 5.668
  • IF 5-year value: 6.201 IF 5-year
    6.201
  • CiteScore value: 6.13 CiteScore
    6.13
  • SNIP value: 1.633 SNIP 1.633
  • IPP value: 5.91 IPP 5.91
  • SJR value: 2.938 SJR 2.938
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 174 Scimago H
    index 174
  • h5-index value: 87 h5-index 87
Volume 16, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11915–11935, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11915-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Global Mercury Observation System – Atmosphere...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 11915–11935, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-11915-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 23 Sep 2016

Research article | 23 Sep 2016

Atmospheric mercury concentrations observed at ground-based monitoring sites globally distributed in the framework of the GMOS network

Francesca Sprovieri1, Nicola Pirrone2, Mariantonia Bencardino1, Francesco D'Amore1, Francesco Carbone1, Sergio Cinnirella1, Valentino Mannarino1, Matthew Landis3, Ralf Ebinghaus4, Andreas Weigelt4, Ernst-Günther Brunke5, Casper Labuschagne5, Lynwill Martin5, John Munthe6, Ingvar Wängberg6, Paulo Artaxo7, Fernando Morais7, Henrique de Melo Jorge Barbosa7, Joel Brito7, Warren Cairns8, Carlo Barbante8,9, María del Carmen Diéguez10, Patricia Elizabeth Garcia10, Aurélien Dommergue11,12, Helene Angot11,12, Olivier Magand12,11, Henrik Skov13, Milena Horvat14, Jože Kotnik14, Katie Alana Read15, Luis Mendes Neves16, Bernd Manfred Gawlik17, Fabrizio Sena17, Nikolay Mashyanov18, Vladimir Obolkin19, Dennis Wip20, Xin Bin Feng21, Hui Zhang21, Xuewu Fu21, Ramesh Ramachandran22, Daniel Cossa23, Joël Knoery24, Nicolas Marusczak23, Michelle Nerentorp25, and Claus Norstrom13 Francesca Sprovieri et al.
  • 1CNR Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, Rende, Italy
  • 2CNR Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, Rome, Italy
  • 3Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
  • 4Helmholtz-Zentrum, Geesthacht, Germany
  • 5Cape Point GAW Station, Climate and Environment Research & Monitoring, South African Weather Service, Stellenbosch, South Africa
  • 6IVL, Swedish Environmental Research Inst. Ltd., Göteborg, Sweden
  • 7University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • 8University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Venice, Italy
  • 9CNR Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes, Venice, Italy
  • 10INIBIOMA-CONICET-UNComa, Bariloche, Argentina
  • 11Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, University Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France
  • 12Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, CNRS, Grenoble, France
  • 13Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
  • 14Jožef Stefan Institute, Lubliana, Slovenia
  • 15NCAS, University of York, York, UK
  • 16Cape Verde Observatory, INMG – São Vicente, Cabo Verde
  • 17Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy
  • 18St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia
  • 19Limnological Institute SB RAS, Irkutsk, Russia
  • 20Department of Physics, University of Suriname, Paramaribo, Suriname
  • 21Institute of Geochemistry, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, China
  • 22Institute for Ocean Management, Anna University, Chennai, India
  • 23LER/PAC, Ifremer,Centre Méditerranée, La Seyne-sur-Mer, France
  • 24LBCM, Ifremer, Centre Atlantique, Nantes, France
  • 25Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract. Long-term monitoring of data of ambient mercury (Hg) on a global scale to assess its emission, transport, atmospheric chemistry, and deposition processes is vital to understanding the impact of Hg pollution on the environment. The Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project was funded by the European Commission (http://www.gmos.eu) and started in November 2010 with the overall goal to develop a coordinated global observing system to monitor Hg on a global scale, including a large network of ground-based monitoring stations, ad hoc periodic oceanographic cruises and measurement flights in the lower and upper troposphere as well as in the lower stratosphere. To date, more than 40 ground-based monitoring sites constitute the global network covering many regions where little to no observational data were available before GMOS. This work presents atmospheric Hg concentrations recorded worldwide in the framework of the GMOS project (2010–2015), analyzing Hg measurement results in terms of temporal trends, seasonality and comparability within the network. Major findings highlighted in this paper include a clear gradient of Hg concentrations between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, confirming that the gradient observed is mostly driven by local and regional sources, which can be anthropogenic, natural or a combination of both.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
This work presents atmospheric Hg concentrations recorded within the GMOS global network analyzing Hg measurement results in terms of temporal trends, seasonality and comparability within the network. The over-arching benefit of this coordinated Hg monitoring network would clearly be the production of high-quality measurement datasets on a global scale useful in developing and validating models on different spatial and temporal scales.
This work presents atmospheric Hg concentrations recorded within the GMOS global network...
Citation