Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 8349-8359, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8349-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
27 Jul 2015
Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources: case study of Murmansk
M. Evans1, N. Kholod1, V. Malyshev2, S. Tretyakova3, E. Gusev2, S. Yu1, and A. Barinov2 1Joint Global Change Research Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 5825 University Research Court, Suite 3500, College Park, MD 20740, USA
2Department of Energy and Transport, Murmansk State Technical University, Murmansk, Russian Federation
3Department of Environment, Murmansk State Technical University, Murmansk, Russian Federation
Abstract. Black carbon (BC) is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climatechange, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularlypronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect onsnow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from dieselsources in the Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the worldabove the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory ofdiesel sources including on-road vehicles, off-road transport (mining,locomotives, construction and agriculture), ships and diesel generators.For on-road transport, we conducted several surveys to understand thevehicle fleet and driving patterns, and, for all sources, we also relied onpublicly available local data sets and analysis. We calculated that BCemissions in the Murmansk Region were 0.40 Gg in 2012. The mining industry isthe largest source of BC emissions in the region, emitting 69 % of all BCemissions because of its large diesel consumption and absence of emissionscontrols. On-road vehicles are the second largest source, emitting about13 % of emissions. Old heavy duty trucks are the major source ofemissions. Emission controls on new vehicles limit total emissions fromon-road transportation. Vehicle traffic and fleet surveys show that many ofthe older cars on the registry are lightly or never used. We also estimatedthat total BC emissions from diesel sources in Russia were 50.8 Gg in 2010,and on-road transport contributed 49 % of diesel BC emissions.Agricultural machinery is also a significant source Russia-wide, in partbecause of the lack of controls on off-road vehicles.

Citation: Evans, M., Kholod, N., Malyshev, V., Tretyakova, S., Gusev, E., Yu, S., and Barinov, A.: Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources: case study of Murmansk, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 8349-8359, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-8349-2015, 2015.
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Short summary
We estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the Arctic. We developed a detailed inventory including on-road vehicles, off-road transport (mining, locomotives, construction and agriculture), fishing and diesel generators. We conducted several surveys to understand the vehicle fleet and driving patterns. BC emissions in Murmansk Region were 0.40 Gg in 2012. Total BC emissions from diesel sources in Russia estimated at 50.8 Gg in 2010.
We estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest...
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