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Volume 15, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 7155–7171, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-7155-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 7155–7171, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-7155-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 01 Jul 2015

Research article | 01 Jul 2015

Fire emission heights in the climate system – Part 1: Global plume height patterns simulated by ECHAM6-HAM2

A. Veira et al.

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Cited articles

Achtemeier, G. L., Goodrick, S. A., Liu, Y., Garcia-Menendez, F., Hu, Y., and Odman, M. T.: Modeling smoke plume-rise and dispersion from southern United States prescribed burns with daysmoke, Atmosphere, 2, 358–388, https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos2030358, 2011.
Briggs, G.: Plume Rise Predictions, Lectures on air pollution and environmental impact analysis, 59–111, 1975.
Crutzen, P. and Andreae, M.: Biomass burning in the tropics: impact on atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemical cycles, Science, 250, 1669–1678, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.250.4988.1669, 1990.
Damoah, R., Spichtinger, N., Servranckx, R., Fromm, M., Eloranta, E. W., Razenkov, I. A., James, P., Shulski, M., Forster, C., and Stohl, A.: A case study of pyro-convection using transport model and remote sensing data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 173–185, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-6-173-2006, 2006.
Publications Copernicus
Short summary
We discuss the representation of wildfire emission heights in global climate models. Our implementation of a simple, semi-empirical plume height parametrization in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2 shows reasonable agreement with observations and with a more complex plume rise model. In contrast, prescribed emission heights, which do not consider the intensity of individual fires, fail to adequately simulate global plume height patterns. Diurnal and seasonal cycles are of minor importance.
We discuss the representation of wildfire emission heights in global climate models. Our...
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