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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 15, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13739–13758, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13739-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 13739–13758, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-13739-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 14 Dec 2015

Research article | 14 Dec 2015

Analysis of CO2 mole fraction data: first evidence of large-scale changes in CO2 uptake at high northern latitudes

J. M. Barlow et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by James Barlow on behalf of the Authors (22 Oct 2015)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Nov 2015) by Paul Monks
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (19 Nov 2015)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (23 Nov 2015) by Paul Monks
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
The major results from our analysis include (1) a significant revision to previously reported estimates of phase changes in the seasonal cycle atmospheric CO2, which are more closely related to changes in the terrestrial biosphere; and (2) an indirect observation that is consistent with high northern latitude ecosystems progressively taking up more CO2 during spring and early summer.
The major results from our analysis include (1) a significant revision to previously reported...
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