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Volume 15, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 11081-11096, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-11081-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 11081-11096, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-11081-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 06 Oct 2015

Research article | 06 Oct 2015

VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

C. Huang1, H. L. Wang1, L. Li1, Q. Wang1, Q. Lu1, J. A. de Gouw2, M. Zhou1, S. A. Jing1, J. Lu1, and C. H. Chen1 C. Huang et al.
  • 1State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of the Formation and Prevention of Urban Air Pollution Complex, Shanghai Academy of Environmental Sciences, Shanghai, China
  • 2Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA

Abstract. Volatile organic compound (VOC) species from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of nine gasoline vehicles, seven diesel vehicles, five motorcycles, and four gas evaporation samples. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were estimated based on the mixing ratio of measured C2–C12 VOC species and inferred carbon number distributions. High aromatic contents were measured in gasoline exhausts and contributed comparatively more SOA yield. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of on-road traffic in Shanghai and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors from previous studies in the cities of China. The inventory-based vehicular organic aerosol (OA) productions to total CO emissions were compared with the observed OA to CO concentrations (ΔOA / ΔCO) in the urban atmosphere. The results indicate that vehicles dominate the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions and OA production, which contributed about 40 and 60 % of OA mass in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. Diesel vehicles, which accounted for less than 20 % of vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT), contribute more than 90 % of vehicular POA emissions and 80–90 % of OA mass derived by vehicles in urban Shanghai. Gasoline exhaust could be an important source of SOA formation. Tightening the limit of aromatic content in gasoline fuel will be helpful to reduce its SOA contribution. Intermediate-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs) in vehicle exhausts greatly contribute to SOA formation in the urban atmosphere of China. However, more experiments need to be conducted to determine the contributions of IVOCs to OA pollution in China.

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SOA formations from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation contribute 40% and 60% of total organic aerosols observed in summer and winter in urban Shanghai. Diesel vehicles, which accounted for less than 20% of vehicle kilometers of travel, contribute the most to vehicular POA emissions and SOA production in urban Shanghai. Intermediate-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs) in vehicle exhausts contribute greatly to SOA formation in the urban atmosphere of China.
SOA formations from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation contribute 40% and 60% of total organic...
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