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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1979-1993, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-1979-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1979-1993, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-1979-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 21 Feb 2012

Research article | 21 Feb 2012

Short-lived climate forcers from current shipping and petroleum activities in the Arctic

K. Ødemark1,3, S. B. Dalsøren2, B. H. Samset2, T. K. Berntsen1,2, J. S. Fuglestvedt2, and G. Myhre2 K. Ødemark et al.
  • 1University of Oslo, Department of Geosciences, Oslo, Norway
  • 2Center for International Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo (CICERO), Oslo, Norway
  • 3The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo, Norway

Abstract. Emissions of short-lived climate forcers (SLCF) in the Arctic region are expected to increase, notably from shipping and petroleum extraction. We here discuss changes in atmospheric SLCF concentrations and resulting radiative forcing (RF) from present day shipping and petroleum activities in the Arctic. The three-dimensional chemistry transport OsloCTM2 and a state of the art radiative forcing model are used, based on a coherent dataset of present day Arctic emissions. We find that the net RF of SLCF of shipping in the Arctic region is negative, mainly due to the direct and indirect RF effects of sulphate emissions, while the net RF of SLCF of petroleum extraction is positive, mainly due to the effects of black carbon aerosols in the air and deposited on snow. Strong seasonal variations of the sensitivities to emissions are found. In terms of annual mean values we find that the Arctic sensitivities to SLCF is similar to global average sensitivities. One exception to this is the stronger snow/ice albedo effect from BC emissions.

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